Author Topic: Anticipation versus post ignition push  (Read 714 times)

Offline J Mercurio

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Anticipation versus post ignition push
« on: February 04, 2019, 12:44:23 PM »
Many shooters don't know the difference between anticipation and post ignition push.  What are the differences?   Anticipation is when a shooter tries to fire the shot and their mind focuses on recoil which they feel is important, but really isn't.  I call it the "now".. They try and fire the gun the second the sights are aligned and before they move off target, hence the now. The result is usually a shot that is low and left or right depending on which hand the shooter shoots with.  Anticipation is most often called jerking the trigger. We've all seen it and done it.  Watch most any shooter use dummy rounds during a slow fire drill and when they come to the dummy round the gun will most likely dip as the hammer falls.

What is Post ignition push?  This is when the gun has gone bang and the shooter is using their hands and arms to control recoil.  Just about every good shooter does this, but they wont anticipate.  The issue is, if you watch a good shooter have a high primer or cartridge that doesn't go bang, you most likely will see the gun dip.  Did you think, "they jerked the trigger"!

How can you tell the difference?  Put a bullseye target out at 15 yards and try and fire accurate shots. If you can fire accurate shots all within a 6 inch bullseye, you're most likely not jerking the trigger, remember, post ignition push occurs after the shot has been fired and has very little, if any influence where the shot will go.  Conversely, anticipation occurs before the shot is fired and will affect accuracy.

If you are anticipating, I suggest you first learn how to pull the trigger without disrupting the sights.  This is best done in dry fire.  I used to balance a penny on the top of my front sight and fire my gun double action, with one hand, without causing the penny to fall.  (single action is too easy, as is a two handed hold).  At first doing it once may be a challenge.  Eventually you can work your way to 10 then 15 then 20.  (You may have to adjust the penny).  You may have seen this done with a shell casing on the slide, again, this is too easy. 

The other drill to use is the ball and dummy drill.  Load you mags with a dummy round every other round.  Its ok that you know its coming up next, the goal is to teach your mind that you can drop the hammer and have the gun not move.  You can also have someone else load you mags to see if your not cheating yourself.  Fire at a small bullseye so you can see and chart improvement.

In regards to post ignition push, this is not a goal, but rather a result of controlling recoil.  There is nothing you have to do, or worry about. this will eventually happen naturally as you become a better shooter. 

Online chfields

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Re: Anticipation versus post ignition push
« Reply #1 on: February 04, 2019, 02:32:41 PM »
That is an excellent explanation, however, how would you dry fire using single action only?
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Offline raytracer

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Re: Anticipation versus post ignition push
« Reply #2 on: February 04, 2019, 08:56:47 PM »
That is an excellent explanation, however, how would you dry fire using single action only?


1: Manually reset the action.
2: Use a SIRT trainer for dryfire practice - less useful unless you shoot a Glock or M&P.
3: Use a Coolfire system. Even more expensive, but available for a pretty wide range of guns - even the CZ75.


I'm a cheapskate, so I just go with manual reset.

Offline J Mercurio

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Re: Anticipation versus post ignition push
« Reply #3 on: February 05, 2019, 12:46:32 AM »
chfields   Id fire the first shot SA, keep the trigger pinned, rack the slide and fire again while resetting the seat.. or just manually cock the hammer before each shot and work on trigger pull.

Offline Rodolfo Fierro

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Re: Anticipation versus post ignition push
« Reply #4 on: February 07, 2019, 11:37:13 AM »
I suggest you first learn how to pull the trigger without disrupting the sights.  This is best done in dry fire. 

In regards to post ignition push, this is not a goal, but rather a result of controlling recoil.  There is nothing you have to do, or worry about. this will eventually happen naturally as you become a better shooter.

The best method that I have found in 25 years of instructing is to dry fire with a laser.  I like using a snap cap and laser to SEE WHAT IS HAPPENING during the trigger pull.  You can practice in your basement or garage.  You will be amazed at the improvement the next time you go to the range !